Choose Animal
Raccoons
Squirrels
Opossum
Armadillos
Rats/Mice
Moles
Groundhog
Skunks
Beaver
Canine
Ferals
Birds
Bats
Snakes
Others
Dead
Professional Wild Animal Control Serving Orlando & Central Florida

Photos of Armadillo Burrows / Holes

Below are some of my photos of armadillo burrows. Feel free to examine them and think about them:


1) A giant amount of dirt has been removed from under this concrete pool deck.


2) An armadillo in the act of digging a fresh burrow - how does it breathe?


3) A standard burrow next to a home - endangering underground pipes and wires.

The problem with these burrows is twofold: first, I've seen several cases in which armadillos have destroyed underground pipes or wires. Armadillos are simply very powerful diggers, and when something gets in their way, they often choose to go through instead of around. The second problem is that if too much dirt is removed, such as in the top photo, there's less support for the structure, and it's vulnerable to cracking. Armadillos can really remove a lot of dirt. These are usually the reasons it's a good idea to have the armadillo taken away from the property. Also, the presence of the animal means that it'll use your yard as a forage base, and you'll wind up with all sorts of little holes all over the place.

Set Trap On Armadillo Burrow - One of the biggest problems that armadillos can cause will be when they actually move into an existing burrow or into a cavity under a shed or outbuilding near a domestic property. Although the majority of armadillos will be quite shy and cautious of areas where there is human activity, areas such as the cavity beneath a shed or a deck can prove very attractive as potential places to live. If this is the case in your property, then there are a couple of options available, but most people will opt to use a cage trap which will allow you to capture the animal and to relocate it away from the area. If the armadillo burrow or the cavity in which it is living has more than one exit point, it is important to block up the other exit points so that the armadillo has no choice but to exit through the hole where you will set the trap. The cage trap should be placed as close as possible to the armadillo hole, but if there is a chance that the armadillo will get by a trap then using wire mesh to guide the animal into the trap can help to catch the animal.


© 2013 OrlandoRats.com - site content, photos, & maintenance by Orlando Rats, and Wild Animal Control
Call 407.538.1694     Fax 407.264.8890     email greg@orlandorats.com      Residential & Commercial      Licensed & Insured